Girls’ Last Tour

Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
Tall grass and open skies
That’s where we’ll be
That’s where we’ll meet
(Yvette Young – A map a string a light)

In Girls’ Last Tour, Earth has been ravaged. Life has been all but extinguished. A permanent winter. All that’s left are cities. Concrete jungles powered by technologies long since abandoned. In that world travel two of the last people, Yuuri and Chito, on their trusty old motorcycle. From skyscraper to subway they move, searching for food and supplies amidst the lost civilization, trying to make sense of the symbols and artifacts left behind by their parents and grandparents generation. What to us are graves, factories, transistor radios and songs, are to them a mystery. Strange, magical things.

What’s great about Girls’ Last Tour is how infectious and hopeful the girls are, but what’s sad is that their world is so completely devoid of art, of life. A life without green, without art, is it worth living? They are wandering through the largest graveyard on the planet and it seems never-ending, but they have each other. Take the people out of their cities, all that’s left are material things with no purpose, instruments without players. People bind it all together. A writer needs a reader, a singer needs an audience. This is a lovely show despite the bleak state of things, full of curiosity and adventure.

Comments

shiinotic says:

I’ve seen about 5 episodes thus far. This show has such a serene quality in spite of the surrounding settings. As someone who tends toward the natural I find the deserted snow covered cityscapes very beautiful, despite the show being completely devoid of green. And the messages of each episode are as nice as any in Aria despite the grim realities of the characters lives. This is definitely one I need to finish and one of my favorites from last year.

bateszi says:

Aria is a good comparison, actually. It’s darker than Aria, but they definitely share a certain sense of warmth.

Pete says:

There’s a ton of art in there, such as the temple and the ever-present statues.

bateszi says:

I guess what I meant is, art is hard to decipher without context. To them, they are just things; buildings and weird structures, things that used to mean something but are now just vague echoes. Like how when we look at Stonehenge, we just see the surface level of rocks organised in a certain pattern, any deeper meaning lost to time.

Leave a reply to bateszi Cancel reply